The Norwegian press came up with the name Bergen Wave to describe the large number of bands and producers – of all shapes and genres – that developed in the west coast city of Bergen in the late 1990s. We’ve picked out 10 of the best electronic albums associated with the movement, although we’re starting the story in another place at another time…

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