The new album by London synthpop quartet Bas Jan deftly combines the everyday and the esoteric. Examples? Fonts on British road signs and the tragic history of Irish witchcraft... 

Want to read more?

Sign up to Electronic Sound Premium to gain access to every post, video, special offers, and more. 100%, all you can eat, no commitment, cancel any time.


Sign Up Now

Already a premium member? Log in here

0 Shares:
You May Also Like
Read More

Mark Reeder: Reed All About It

Mark Reeder is one of the many intriguing characters to have emerged from the outrageously fertile Manchester music scene of the late 1970s. Here he talks about New Order, his life in berlin, the art of the remix
Read More

Bluedot 2023 Review

Even four days of monsoon-style rain could not diminish the sparkle or dampen the enthusiasm of the crowd at this year’s Bluedot festival. From ‘Doctor Who’ to the inimitable powerhouse that is Grace Jones, there were so many highlights…
Read More

Kim Gordon 

In which the ice-cool alt-rock queen serves up a new album packed with electronic tricks. ‘No Home Record’ also happens to be her solo long-playing debut.
Read More

A Sheffield Story: From Vice Versa To Abc

Hard as it is to fathom, the gold lamé and grand orchestral pop of Sheffield’s ABC developed out of post-punk experimentalist outfit Vice Versa. What were they putting in the water up there in South Yorkshire?
Read More

The Gift of Sound and Vision: Malcolm Garrett

If you were a teenager in the 1980s, Malcolm Garrett’s iconic record covers most probably crazy-paved your bedroom floor. Inspired by a love for electronic music and a hefty dose of early punk, his revolutionary design ideas reverberate to this day
Read More

Gerald V Casale: Rage Against the Machine

When Devo’s Gerald V Casale came up with a new solo vehicle in the early 2000s, America was not ready for Jihad Jerry And The Evildoers. With a snazzy new re-release and a brand new track, perhaps the time is now. After all, his is not a holy war…